Feeds

Linux to help police with their enquiries?

Desktop feasibility study for open source OS

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

An influential UK police advisory body has embarked on a three-month feasibility study on using Linux on police force desktops throughout England and Wales.

The Police Information Technology Organisation (PITO), a government body which provides information technology, communications systems and services to the police, is assessing the issues of deploying Linux on up to 60,000 desktop computers.

The evaluation will look at whether the open source OS could meet police requirements on security, stability cost and compatibility with existing systems. Much will depend on the outcome of the study, due in late March, and a PITO spokeswoman was keen to stress that no commitment to Linux has yet been made.

Even though the idea might be shelved, the initial view of Linux by PITO is favourable.

In a statement PITO said: "The police need very secure, virus resistant and stable desktop computing. We believe that Linux can provide this.

"There is a potential total requirement for 60,000 Linux desktop systems within the UK Police Forces so we need a very good understanding of the deployment and migration issues to Linux on the desktop.'

A contract to carry out the study has been awarded to ecommerce consultancy netproject.

Eddie Bleasdale, a director at Netproject, said it was considering recommending a system where police Linux PCs would be set up so that users cannot modify or add software to the PC. The Linux PCs will be configured to be highly secure, with the use of both smart cards and biometrics to enable user identification. Software would be updated over the network.

The Linux study, forms part of a much wider assessment, called Project Valiant, which will examine the requirements for the next generation of police computing. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows
Behold the Internet of Things. Wintel Things
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.