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Kim Schmitz, the founder of a group that made unsubstantiated claims to have hacked a Sudanese bank with bin Laden accounts, faces insider dealing charges in Germany after his fast-track deportation from Thailand.

Associated Press reports that Schmitz (aka Kimble) arrived back in his native Munich earlier today and was promptly arrested for insider trading of shares in letsbuyit.com.

Schmitz is accused of using insider knowledge to buy shares worth approximately $375,000 and quickly turn them around for $1.5 million.

Last Friday, Thai police arrested Schmitz in Bangkok, acting on a German warrant charging him with securities fraud. Schmitz also faces an "order or summary punishment because of investment fraud", AP reports.

Schmitz, was the founder of YIHAT (Young Intelligent Hackers Against Terrorism), an 'elite' crew of IRC kiddies determined to use their mad skillz to track down international terrorist Osama bin Laden. Schmitz has also claimed to be a master hacker himself, in addition to being a financial wizard.

Last October Schmitz claimed that his YIHAT guard had obtained data on accounts held by members of Al Qaeda, including bin Laden, held at the AlShamal Islamic Bank in Sudan, but he offered not one shred of proof.

Schmitz posted a cryptic message on his site last week advertising plans to commit suicide - or at least his crossing "to a new world" - yesterday (his birthday).

This proved to be a publicity stunt and visitors to the site are now informed that Schmitz wishes to be known as "King Kimble the First - Ruler of the Kimpire". Surfers will also find a link that allows them to email Kimble in prison.

We doubt this will do much to impress the German authorities... ®

Related stories

YIHAT founder Kimble/Schmitz arrested
bin Laden hackmeister 'flees' Germany
bin Laden hackers denounce founder
bin Laden hack-meister in defacement, financial debacles
Tables turns on Bin Laden 'bank crackers'
We've cracked into bin Laden's bank - UK hackers
Kimble.org offers $10m reward for arrest of bin Laden
Letsbuyit awakes from coma

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