Feeds

IBM to use Power4 across the pSeries line In 2002?

ASAP

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

How ready is IBM to put the Power4 processors across its pSeries and iSeries lines of midrange and enterprise servers? Apparently a lot more ready than many of us had been led to believe, Timothy Prickett Morgan writes.

According to IBM chief financial officer John Joyce, who was speaking to Wall Street analysts during the company's conference call discussing Big Blue's fourth quarter financial results last week, IBM is preparing to put the Power4 chips into its low-end and midrange pSeries servers by the end of 2002.

Under plans that IBM was kicking around last year, customers and business partners were told that IBM would crank up the clock on the current 750MHz S-Star PowerPC processors, perhaps to 800MHz or maybe even 900MHz.

But the unofficial word from within IBM as the year was turning was that IBM wants to roll the Power4 processor into as many products as possible, as soon as possible. IBM plans to sell new S-Star machines to customers throughout 2002, and that might be extended a little longer. Upgrades for these machines will be available for some time after that, perhaps 12 to 24 months, depending on IBM's mood and the availability of chip and related components.

Some people expect IBM to use the "Cell" Power processors being co-developed with Sony and Toshiba for consumer devices and games machines in low-end and midrange pSeries servers. This may or may not happen.

The technical specs of these chips are unknown, except that IBM says they will have teraflops of number-crunching power. While they may not be designed specifically for servers, at high enough clock speeds, they could run inefficiently in a server and because of volume economics on the chips, still yield a great bang for the buck on file, print and Web serving. If these chips see the light of day IBM has committed $400m over five years to design the Cell chip in its Austin labs--they could pack a lot more wallop than an S-Star PowerPC chip.

At the high-end of the pSeries line, IBM's next generation of servers, due in 2003, is a crank on the just-announced Regatta line using the Power4-II processors. These are expected in October 2002, in fact. These second-generation Regattas will support 16 chips each with two processors per chip (32 processing elements with a shared L2 cache) running at around 1.5GHz to 1.6GHz, 384GB of main memory and up to 100TB of storage; the current Regattas have 16 chips, supplied with either one or two CPUs, running at 1.1GHz or 1.3GHz and support 256GB of main memory and 36TB of storage.

© Computerwire.com. All rights reserved.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.