Feeds

Avaya dismisses potential H.323 and SIP standards merger

IP to the SIP trip

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

ComputerWire: IT Industry Intelligence

Enterprise networking equipment vendor Avaya Inc has dismissed the idea of any potential unification between the two key standards in enterprise


communications, H.323 and the emerging internet engineering task force (IETF) standard SIP.

The session initiation protocol is now close to final ratification by IETF, whereas H.323 which is a mature International Telecommunication Union (ITU) standard that has defined the way that video and speech are transmitted over IP networks, originally used for videoconferencing. The problem is that although massive resources have been put behind H.323, and installing support for it within enterprise and carrier networks, the protocol remains fixed in its allegiance to the telecoms world, and the standards body that approved it, the ITU.

"They will not merge, we need distinct interfaces and protocols," says Mickey Tsui, Avaya vice president of IP solutions. SIP and H.323 are largely analogous, although SIP borrows far more heavily from internet standards, mapping IP addresses to uniform resource locators (URLs) , rather than mapping identities onto network endpoints.

Avaya expects to launch its first fully enabled voice over IP products, with SIP support in mid-year. The difference between the two is that "fundamentally
the protocols are designed to address different aspects. With SIP services the network understands where you are, with H.323 it is designed for gateways and endpoints," says Tsui.

This means that it is fundamentally easier to use the concepts within SIP to create new applications, both in telecoms networks and enterprise networks. And there is a far lower overhead for using SIP services both in desktop and mobile clients, Tsui believes.

Currently the company is testing and demonstrating early enterprise applications with customers, in advance of a full roll out in mid-year.

Basking Ridge, New Jersey-based Avaya, desperately needs SIP to take off, as it needs to develop new hardware and services that add the promise of web integration to existing enterprise telephony, above what is possible within existing networks.

© Computerwire.com. All rights reserved.

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
Cutting cancer rates: Data, models and a happy ending?
How surgery might be making cancer prognoses worse
Silicon Valley jolted by magnitude 6.1 quake – its biggest in 25 years
Did the earth move for you at VMworld – oh, OK. It just did. A lot
Forrester says it's time to give up on physical storage arrays
The physical/virtual storage tipping point may just have arrived
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?