Feeds

Korea migrates 120K civil servants to Linux desktop

Microsoft is big loser

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The Power of One eBook: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

The Korean government is to buy 120,000 copies of Hancom Linux Deluxe this year, enough to switch 23 per cent of its installed base Microsoft user to open source equivalents.

By standardising on Linux and HancomOffice, the Korean government expects to make savings of 80 per cent, compared with buying Microsoft products.

This should be regarded as a big setback for Microsoft in Korea, for many years one of the few countries in which it was not the dominant player in all of the desktops app business.

The thorn in its side was Haansoft, formerly known as Hangul and Computer, which is the owner of the Hancom business. Until the late 90s, the Hangul wordprocessor was the major wordprocessing package in Korea with 90 per cent-plus market share. (This dominance was not reflected in sales figures - as most packages were pirated.)

Microsoft even tried to buy the company in 1999 - but was beaten back by a fierce, nationalistic campaign conducted by local consumers and business (Story: Koreans raise the Anti-Microsoft standard).

The combination of cost imperative and patriotism may be even more attractive in many other Asian countries - Korea is, after all the world's 11th biggest economy. And despite suffering economic crisis in the late 90s, Korea has deeper pockets than most of its neighbours.

China, the biggest prize of all - potentially - could already be slipping from Microsoft's grasp. This month Gartner noted the award of contracts by the Beijing municipal governments to six indigenous bidders, with the seventh, Microsoft, rejected (Story: Red Flag Linux beats out Windows in Beijing). ®

Related stories

UK Gov agency threatens to dump 500,000 Windows desktops
MS loses Korean action over Windows trademark

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Captain Kirk sets phaser to SLAUGHTER after trying new Facebook app
William Shatner less-than-impressed by Zuck's celebrity-only app
Apple fanbois SCREAM as update BRICKS their Macbook Airs
Ragegasm spills over as firmware upgrade kills machines
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
Chrome browser has been DRAINING PC batteries for YEARS
Google is only now fixing ancient, energy-sapping bug
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.