Feeds

MS hires compliance lawyers to keep it honest

Pre-emptive strike on final judgment

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Microsoft's eagerness to comply with the terms of the antitrust settlement deal that it has appointed not one but two legal compliance officers, early. Indeed, as the Proposed Final Judgment remains merely proposed until the judge decides whether or not to accept it, Microsoft might find itself not needing its two appointments at all.

Not to comply with the terms of a Final Judgment, anyway - but whichever way the courts cut it, it probably does make sense for Microsoft to have a couple of skilled antitrust and compliance lawyers inside keeping it honest. Or as Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer puts it:

"As a major employer and a leader in our industry, we take our legal obligations very seriously. These new compliance officers will help us do an even better job of understanding our responsibilities under the law and ensuring that all our people know what’s expected of them. We are committed to full compliance with the antitrust settlement, as well as all the other laws and regulations affecting our business."

There you go, an even better job than Microsoft's been doing all this time. Heart-warming stuff, and don't we all remember the tributes paid to Microsoft's respect for itsw legal obligations by the District and Appeals Courts?

The officers are Odell Guyton and David Dadoun. Guyton, a former federal prosecutor and most recently compliance officer at the University of Pennsylvania, will serve as director of compliance. Dadoun is a former antitrust enforcement lawyer for the FTC, and was more recently a partner in Seattle law firm Foster Pepper & Shefelman, dealing in antitrust. He's actually been working for Microsoft since at least October, dealing with antitrust aspects of the company's M&A strategy.

Foster Pepper & Shefelman let about 30 attorneys and support staff go in November, the Puget Sound Business Journal tells us, but tis couldn't have included antitrust specialists. Not in Seattle, surely. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.