Feeds

MS hires compliance lawyers to keep it honest

Pre-emptive strike on final judgment

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

Microsoft's eagerness to comply with the terms of the antitrust settlement deal that it has appointed not one but two legal compliance officers, early. Indeed, as the Proposed Final Judgment remains merely proposed until the judge decides whether or not to accept it, Microsoft might find itself not needing its two appointments at all.

Not to comply with the terms of a Final Judgment, anyway - but whichever way the courts cut it, it probably does make sense for Microsoft to have a couple of skilled antitrust and compliance lawyers inside keeping it honest. Or as Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer puts it:

"As a major employer and a leader in our industry, we take our legal obligations very seriously. These new compliance officers will help us do an even better job of understanding our responsibilities under the law and ensuring that all our people know what’s expected of them. We are committed to full compliance with the antitrust settlement, as well as all the other laws and regulations affecting our business."

There you go, an even better job than Microsoft's been doing all this time. Heart-warming stuff, and don't we all remember the tributes paid to Microsoft's respect for itsw legal obligations by the District and Appeals Courts?

The officers are Odell Guyton and David Dadoun. Guyton, a former federal prosecutor and most recently compliance officer at the University of Pennsylvania, will serve as director of compliance. Dadoun is a former antitrust enforcement lawyer for the FTC, and was more recently a partner in Seattle law firm Foster Pepper & Shefelman, dealing in antitrust. He's actually been working for Microsoft since at least October, dealing with antitrust aspects of the company's M&A strategy.

Foster Pepper & Shefelman let about 30 attorneys and support staff go in November, the Puget Sound Business Journal tells us, but tis couldn't have included antitrust specialists. Not in Seattle, surely. ®

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Why Oracle CEO Larry Ellison had to go ... Except he hasn't
Silicon Valley's veteran seadog in piratical Putin impression
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.