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Intel confirms 845D DDR chipset shipping ‘early’

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Intel has admitted it has begun shipping its DDR-based Pentium 4 chipset, the 845D, ahead of schedule.

"We've started shipping to prepare our manufacturers for the launch,'' said an Intel spokeswoman in Hong Kong. "The official launch isn't until the first quarter next year."

True, but since it is well known that Intel would be shipping the part ahead of the "official launch", the company's statement isn't as impressive as it would like us all to think. Typically, Intel releases products early to allow PC makers and motherboard companies to be able to launch on the same day as Intel's own launch. However, while the 845D is still officially to be launched early next year, 845D-based mobos are expected to begin shipping early next week.

As we noted yesterday, Intel is keen on pushing the 845D over the older, single data rate SDRAM-oriented 845, which was arguably just a stop-gap product designed to drive low-end P4 sales until Intel's agreement with Rambus permitted it to ship a DDR chipset. ®

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Intel pushes 845D DDR chipset over PC133 predecessor

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