Feeds

Single EU telecoms market edges closer to reality

Compromise deal just days away

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Boost IT visibility and business value

The plan to build a single European market for telecoms and Internet services has edged closer to reality with the European Parliament welcoming last-minute changes by member states to new laws.

Parliament will vote on the revised legislation tomorrow and it will then be sent back to all individual countries for final approval.

The dream of running a EU-wide set of regulations for the telecoms market has been tied up for a year now as the member states have refused to allow the EU to take precedence over their home regulators.

Continued argument and concessions on both sides have finally come up with laws that allow for standardised markets across Europe - with all the economies of scale and efficiencies that that implies - but enable individual countries in most situations to decide how to regulate their home industry.

The EU will still retain a veto when trade between member states is affected by one telecoms company's approach.

The deal is far from being completed however. It has stopped short of imposing a common standard for digital TV - which many within Parliament were keen on - although countries and companies are likely to adopt the heavily recommended MHP (Multimedia Home Platform) standard. The European Commission also wanted to put controls on the emerging 3G market.

If Parliament and member states can't agree this time, the whole package will be sent to a committee to sort out the differences - an action which many fear could lose the hard-fought-for compromises in the existing deal.

One of the main figures behind the legislation, Commissioner for Enterprise and the Information Society, Erkki Liikanen told the FT: "This is a major step form detailed ex-ante regulations to pro-competitive measures. And it is the most concrete case of simplication since it brings 20 pieces of legislation down to six."

Liikanen has been working on greater EU integration for several years. He was the driving force behind unbundling the local loop across Europe - something that has opened up Internet access across Europe far faster than it we had relied on market competition. ®

Related Stories

Europe faces legal action over 'disappointing' LLU
Europe to make broadband top priority next year
Local loop laggards face EU legal action
Europe to investigate legality of RIP

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
HP busts out new ProLiant Gen9 servers
Think those are cool? Wait till you get a load of our racks
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
Community chest: Storage firms need to pay open-source debts
Samba implementation? Time to get some devs on the job
Like condoms, data now comes in big and HUGE sizes
Linux Foundation lights a fire under storage devs with new conference
Silicon Valley jolted by magnitude 6.1 quake – its biggest in 25 years
Did the earth move for you at VMworld – oh, OK. It just did. A lot
Gamma's not a goner! UK ISP sorts out major outage
Says BT is the root of the problem
prev story

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.