Feeds

Compaq cavalry rescues Linux clusters

Don't shoot the horses

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

In May, Compaq said it would GPL its NSC, or Non Stop Clusters code. This is the code that SCO licensed and co-developed as UnixWare Non Stop Clusters. Compaq announced two projects - The CI Project (for the infrastructure) and SSI, and Bruce Walker's seven man team in Los Angeles has been making progress.

High Availability clustering can extend Linux from its current role in network plumbling and edge tasks, such as web serving, into the heart of the business running database and TP jobs.

Compaq's intervention is timely. At the Cluster File Systems Birds-of-a-Feather session at LinuxWorld in August, Peter Braam described how significant the Compaq SSI could prove:

"The various Linux HA Projects have fragmented really badly," he said. "It's almost all proprietary, and here with one blow is a pretty comprehensive applications platform: Oracle can failover from node to node.

"Compaq SSI has a huge amount of high quality code: which is not only extremely high performance but all the pieces you need to do the cluster completely."

You can find an HTML presentation by Walker here with a PowerPoint version of the slides here[276k].

Walker's involvement with the code predates Compaq. It's in its fifth generation now, with its origins in the Locus system which began life at UCLA in 1979, he told us in August. Along the way the ideas were implemented in a clustered kernel for IBM, in Intel's Paragon machine, and clustered Compaq PS/2s. After a couple of years close work with Tandem, the latter acquired the group in 1996, shortly before Q bought Tandem.

Earlier this year SCO's new owners Caldera decided that maintaining two UnixWare kernels, one with NSC and one without, was too expensive. But that removed an important obstacle to the code being released under a software libre license.

What else? Oh yes, the topical bit: SourceForge has unveiled a new section of the site, a "Cluster Foundry", for the two projects and related Linux cluster work, which you can find here. ®

Related Links

Cluster Infrastructure for Linux - SourceForge
Single System Image Clusters for Linux - SourceForge

Related Stories

SCO UnixWare NSC

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Docker's app containers are coming to Windows Server, says Microsoft
MS chases app deployment speeds already enjoyed by Linux devs
IBM storage revenues sink: 'We are disappointed,' says CEO
Time to put the storage biz up for sale?
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
Symantec backs out of Backup Exec: Plans to can appliance in Jan
Will still provide support to existing customers
VMware's tool to harden virtual networks: a spreadsheet
NSX security guide lands in intriguing format
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.