Feeds

Bluetooth will be a success after all

Next year

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Bluetooth may be several years late but it's going to be a great success and 26.2 million Bluetooth-enabled mobiles will be sold next year, a new report by ARC Group claims.

But that's nothing compared to the 100 million Bluetooth handsets which will be sold in 2003 when 3G networks start kicking in. From there the numbers get staggeringly big and you have to switch to percentages - 71 per cent of all mobiles sold in 2006 will have Bluetooth, it says.

The report is called "Bluetooth - Personal Area Networks" - presumably a reference to the frequent confusion that Bluetooth is somehow a direct rival to 802.11, the wireless protocol for Local Area Networks.

Its author, Karen Walsh, thinks Bluetooth is wonderful. "The technology will be instrumental in facilitating consumer interest in handset renewal and the uptake of even more sophisticated data services, which in turn will lead to increased data traffic and Average Revenue Per User," she says without pausing for breath.

One key factor behind its takeup apparently is its ability to "allow consumers to bridge between the Internet and their personal portable devices". 3G will "increase the value of Bluetooth mobile phones" and "PDAs are also expected to play a big role in early Bluetooth adoption, especially among professional users".

The Arc Group report is one of a long line of "Bluetooth is Great" surveys: in January this yearFrost & Sullivan forecast that 11 million Bluetooth units would be shipped this year. We're now in November and unless there is a sudden, mind-blowing Bluetooth Xmas frenzy, that figure will not be reached.

And even with such a frenzy (we're assuming limitless supply), there's just no way the 56 million units that Allied Business Intelligence predicted in September last year will be sold.

ARC's report estimates Bluetooth-enabled unit shipments this year at 1.5 million.

Sales projections aside, Bluetooth is finally finally ready and the technology is set to be the star of the show at Comdex next week. Who knows what next year will bring. ®

Related Stories

Microsoft turns the drill on Bluetooth
Bluetooth not vapourware, survey shocker
We all still want Bluetooth

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.