Feeds

Bluetooth gives bite to high speed wireless network

Net access at 384Kbps, range of up to 100m

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

A high speed urban wireless network based on Bluetooth is launching this week in Manchester.

Speedwave, which its developers said is a world first, will offer Internet access at around 384Kbps at ranges of up to 100 metres from sites in the network, and is been built in preparation for next year's Commonwealth Games.

Bluetooth is commonly thought of as a short-range wireless technology and the distance boost comes from using high gain antenna from Swedish firm Blue2Space.

Blue2Link devices (a combined Web server, aerial and microprocessor from Blue2Space) form the main access point to the Speedwave network from connected sites. There'll be to two or three access points in each site.

The pilot program (which begins this week at the Weston Building of the Manchester Conference Centre) will be completed in 2002, after which Speedwave will be rolled out to 70 sites (hotels, airports and coffee shops) across Manchester.

Phillip Coen, managing director of Netario, which is developing and integrating Speedwave, said access to the network would be offered through either a corporate subscription or on a "pay as you go basis" to the public.

As well as high speed Internet access, Internet telephony will be introduced in around six months time. Wireless closed circuit TV is also slated for delivery.

Coen said he decided to build the network using Bluetooth, rather than 802.11b wireless LANS, because of a number of advantages.

Bluetooth is supported by Palm Pilot and mobile phones, it uses less power, supports three voice channels and has better security than 802.11b, Coen said.

Netario is working with Compaq (for Bluetooth Compaq Flash), TDK and Palm as suppliers of client devices, and Kingston, JANET and Atlantic Telecom for connectivity. It hopes to build networks similar to Speedwave in 13 UK cities and in five further continental towns. ®

Related Stories

Rocky road to wireless networking nirvana
Palm m525 to boast built-in Bluetooth
Secure the Wireless Network firmware
Microsoft turns the drill on Bluetooth
We're backing Bluetooth, Intel reiterates
Bluetooth demos flop at CeBit
Bluetooth not vapourware, survey shocker

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz
Whole new species of XaaS spawning in the antipodes
AWS pulls desktop-as-a-service from the PC
Support for PCoIP protocol means zero clients can run cloudy desktops
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.