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Intel super shrinks flash memory

Flash, aahhhhaa, saviour of the universe

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Intel has announced a new flash memory product today, built on its 0.13-micron production process technology. Flash memory is a type of non-volatile memory, usually used to hold control code like your PCs BIOS.

The new chip (officially called the 3 Volt Advanced+ Boot Block flash) is almost half the size of its predecessor and, of course, consumes yet less power. This type of gadget is commonly used in mobile phones, digital cameras, embedded controllers and other electronic gizmos where it does things like storing program code and your user data like, say, your address book.

The flash should allow manufacturers to build even smaller devices than ever before and is apparently over 200 times smaller in cell size than the original flash memory produced by the company in the mid 80s (remember mobile phones in the late 80s?).

The company is busy testing a 32Mb version right now, which will be in production in the second quarter of next year. 64Mb will follow later in the year. ®

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Intel Introduces First Flash Memory Product On 0.13-Micron Process Technology

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