Feeds

The451.com is back from the dead

Management buys up assets

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Subscription-only tech news site The451.com is back, after chief exec Martin McCarthy led a management buy- up of the company's name and other assets from the receivers.

The new The451.com has kept the offices in New York and San Francisco, but has no plans to re-open its London digs. All the US staff are back on board in full-time or freelance capacities, according to McCarthy. He is negotiating similar deals with the UK staffers, but admits there will be fewer people working on The451 than the 25 or so who were employed before its brush with death.

Majority-owner Durlacher announced to the stock market on Monday 15 October that receivers had been brought in to handle the site's company 45Onecom Ltd.

The451.com was valued at £500,000 at the end of June, but McCarthy declined to say what it had cost to buy the name, database of subscribers (in the thousands according to McCarthy) and back file of wide-ranging IT analysis stories, plus PCs and some furniture.

The Register has always been sceptical that an online publishing model, requiring large numbers subscribers to pay for mainstream IT news and analysis, would survive, when idiots like ourselves are giving the stuff away for free.

McCarthy is confident that the model will work with a bit of retuning. "The cost structure didn't quite jibe with our revenues," he said then pointed out that losing a London office and some staff has addressed this issue.

What about competitors giving content away for free? "I come from a background where people are prepared to pay for quality," said McCarthy.

But The Reg is good and free. "I'm not too familiar with your site, but with all due respect we have a higher quality offering," said McCarthy.

The Reg always said The 451.com was absurdly self-regarding but McCarthy may have a point. In our story The451.com is dead, we suggested the company's Manhattan offices on 5th Avenue were swanky, coming complete with leather sofa and exposed brick; one visitor described the set-up as "the dog's bollocks".

Apparently the sofa is naugahyde, not leather, and had been left there by the previous tenant. The brick is exposed because of a minor damp problem. ®

Related Stories

The451.com is dead
The451.com wields job axe

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?