Feeds

Recording industry ‘copyright DoS attack’ rumored

Too good to be true?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

We know the entertainment industry has sought to slip language into current anti-terror legislation which could result in blanket immunity from prosecution for hacking file-sharing networks.

We know the entertainment industry fervently desires to parlay the secular sacrament of copyright into a monopoly on content production and distribution, and ultimately extend it to extort consumers with some sort of pay-per-use DRM scheme.

So it's easy to believe that, after being spurned by Congress in its bid to hack with impunity, the industry would settle for the next best thing: shutting down file-shares with DoS attacks.

No intrusion; no destruction of data. Just tie up the rogue network with automated download requests, and so stop the suspected infringer from sharing with the public.

This, we are told, is precisely what the recording industry is plotting, according to a ZD-Net story entitled "RIAA: We'll smother song swappers" by John Borland.

Citing "sources at the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA)," Borland tells us that the scheme is under consideration. It's apparently being shopped to the RIAA by opportunistic software vendors.

"According to industry sources, the technology is being provided by outside technology companies and has not yet found its way into wide use."

Too vague by half, except that the RIAA's recent legislative debacle has primed us to believe it. Had it not been for that, we might just be a bit more skeptical.

So for fun, let's pretend that this item came along out of the blue. Are we satisfied with this 'according to sources' and 'outside technology companies' business?

Wouldn't we like to know what sort of sources? Sure, they want to remain anonymous, and that's fine. We're not asking for names in print. But what are we talking about here? A senior executive? A middle manager? A secretary? A receptionist? A janitor?

And what's up with this 'technology companies' business? Why not name names in this case? Companies don't have any right to anonymity. If a company is trying to sell a DoS tool to the RIAA, the public deserves to know who they are.

And what sort of technology do they deal in? DRM, perhaps? Is it a big company traded on the NYSE? Is it a startup? Is it a couple of Linux kids from the local high-school maths club?

Too vague by half. ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
14 antivirus apps found to have security problems
Vendors just don't care, says researcher, after finding basic boo-boos in security software
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
Only '3% of web servers in top corps' fully fixed after Heartbleed snafu
Just slapping a patched OpenSSL on a machine ain't going to cut it, we're told
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Israel's Iron Dome missile tech stolen by Chinese hackers
Corporate raiders Comment Crew fingered for attacks
Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Researcher sat on critical IE bugs for THREE YEARS
VUPEN waited for Pwn2Own cash while IE's sandbox leaked
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.