Feeds

Recording industry exploits WTC tragedy to hack you

How low can they go?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes

Capitol Hill lobbyists representing the Recording Industry Ass. of America (RIAA) tried to attach a self-serving amendment to recent anti-terror legislation which would have made it legal for copyright owners to hack computer networks in search of copyright-infringing material and destroy them, Wired News reports.

Panic over proposals which would have made all forms of hacking and computer sabotage a 'terrorist act' punishable by life in prison appears to have inspired the entertainment industry to secure itself an exception so it can 'go vigilante' to defend the precious sacrament of copyright.

The proposed amendment reads:

"No action may be brought under this subsection arising out of any impairment of the availability of data, a program, a system or information, resulting from measures taken by an owner of copyright in a work of authorship, or any person authorized by such owner to act on its behalf, that are intended to impede or prevent the infringement of copyright in such work by wire or electronic communication; provided that the use of the work that the owner is intending to impede or prevent is an infringing use."

We note the phrase 'any impairment', a blanket which would indeed sanction network sabotage, and which implies the right to use nefarious means of detection. If it didn't, it would have clearly specified 'action taken on evidence lawfully obtained'. But it doesn't. 'Any impairment' includes installing a Trojan on a file-share network, and then remotely wiping it out.

Fortunately this ignoble effort failed, but the RIAA still inclines towards a presumption that existing law should shield them from such malevolent activities. And if their little bought lapdogs, US Senators Fritz Hollings (Democrat, South Carolina) and Ted Stevens (Republican, Alaska), have their way with a proposed super-DMCA called the Security Systems Standards and Certification Act (SSSCA), they might just make that mad assertion stick. ®

Related Story

'Killer DMCA' to mandate digital-rights compliant hardware

Related Link

The Wired report

A new approach to endpoint data protection

More from The Register

next story
Philip K Dick 'Nazi alternate reality' story to be made into TV series
Amazon Studios, Ridley Scott firm to produce The Man in the High Castle
Nintend-OH NO! Sorry, Mario – your profits are in another castle
Red-hatted mascot, red-colored logo, red-stained finance books
Sonos AXES support for Apple's iOS4 and 5
Want to use your iThing? You can't - it's too old
Joe Average isn't worth $10 a year to Mark Zuckerberg
The Social Network deflates the PC resurgence with mobile-only usage prediction
Feel free to BONK on the TUBE, says Transport for London
Plus: Almost NOBODY uses pay-by-bonk on buses - Visa
Twitch rich as Google flicks $1bn hitch switch, claims snitch
Gameplay streaming biz and search king refuse to deny fresh gobble rumors
Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE
4,000 pixels is niche now... Don't say we didn't warn you
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?