Feeds

Recording industry exploits WTC tragedy to hack you

How low can they go?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Capitol Hill lobbyists representing the Recording Industry Ass. of America (RIAA) tried to attach a self-serving amendment to recent anti-terror legislation which would have made it legal for copyright owners to hack computer networks in search of copyright-infringing material and destroy them, Wired News reports.

Panic over proposals which would have made all forms of hacking and computer sabotage a 'terrorist act' punishable by life in prison appears to have inspired the entertainment industry to secure itself an exception so it can 'go vigilante' to defend the precious sacrament of copyright.

The proposed amendment reads:

"No action may be brought under this subsection arising out of any impairment of the availability of data, a program, a system or information, resulting from measures taken by an owner of copyright in a work of authorship, or any person authorized by such owner to act on its behalf, that are intended to impede or prevent the infringement of copyright in such work by wire or electronic communication; provided that the use of the work that the owner is intending to impede or prevent is an infringing use."

We note the phrase 'any impairment', a blanket which would indeed sanction network sabotage, and which implies the right to use nefarious means of detection. If it didn't, it would have clearly specified 'action taken on evidence lawfully obtained'. But it doesn't. 'Any impairment' includes installing a Trojan on a file-share network, and then remotely wiping it out.

Fortunately this ignoble effort failed, but the RIAA still inclines towards a presumption that existing law should shield them from such malevolent activities. And if their little bought lapdogs, US Senators Fritz Hollings (Democrat, South Carolina) and Ted Stevens (Republican, Alaska), have their way with a proposed super-DMCA called the Security Systems Standards and Certification Act (SSSCA), they might just make that mad assertion stick. ®

Related Story

'Killer DMCA' to mandate digital-rights compliant hardware

Related Link

The Wired report

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'
PM urged to 'prioritise issue' after Facebook hindsight find
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Assange™ slumps back on Ecuador's sofa after detention appeal binned
Swedish court rules there's 'great risk' WikiLeaker will dodge prosecution
NSA mass spying reform KILLED by US Senators
Democrats needed just TWO more votes to keep alive bill reining in some surveillance
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.