Feeds

IBM kicks EMC where it hurts

Wal-Mart switch

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top three mobile application threats

Things don't get any easier at EMC. While much of the world's media is speculating, quite stupidly, on its imminent acquisition by IBM, those people that actually use EMC kit are keeping a beady eye on the firm's fortunes.

Yesterday those fortunes took yet another turn for the worst as EMC lost it's one-time flagship customer Wal-Mart. Worse still, it was IBM that stole it.

The deal is an out-and-out coup for IBM. Wal-Mart will install 12 of Z Series mainframes and 20 Shark storage systems at the firm. These systems will apparently replace EMC and HDS kit.

For IBM it gives serious validation of its storage and mainframe story. For EMC this may be a decisive moment.

Any storage company that has Wal Mart on its books is a happy storage company. Wal-Mart, in case you don't know, is one of those big, stack 'em high, sell 'em cheap type of supermarkets. It operates more than 4,500 stores worldwide and has something in the region of 100 million people through its doors every week, - yes - every week.

That is, as you can imagine an awful lot of data. And any storage company that has Wal-Mart on its books is a happy storage company. EMC in particular is, or was, very proud indeed of its Wal-Mart heritage. About four years ago, on a press trip, EMC and Wal Mart gave us a tour of the Wal-Mart data centre and it was highly impressive. It showed just how far EMC had come – and just how much IBM had lost.

Now it looks like the tables are well and truly turned. Where EMC once held the lion's share of mainframe storage, IBM is gradually winning it back. The one thing lacked by IBM was a flagship Z-Series/Shark customer: Wal-Mart has given it this prize.

So what does EMC do now? According to various reports that have been doing the rounds over the past couple of weeks, EMC's top boy has a master plan that will be rolled out when times get really bad. Now it seems might be the time to roll out that strategy.

© IT-Analysis.com. All rights reserved.

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
AMD's 'Seattle' 64-bit ARM server chips now sampling, set to launch in late 2014
But they won't appear in SeaMicro Fabric Compute Systems anytime soon
Brit boffins use TARDIS to re-route data flows through time and space
'Traffic Assignment and Retiming Dynamics with Inherent Stability' algo can save ISPs big bucks
Microsoft's Nadella: SQL Server 2014 means we're all about data
Adds new big data tools in quest for 'ambient intelligence'
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.