Feeds

Tempers cool in Pay to Play Web row

Knives, forks buried

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

3 Big data security analytics techniques

The W3C has invited Bruce Perens and Free Software Foundation counsel Eben Moglen to join the next round of debate on whether to allow companies the right to charge for using future web standards that come under its proposed 'RAND' license.

The two are to join the W3C's Patent Policy working group, as "invited experts", the W3C announced late on Friday.

Membership of the group is currently drawn from W3C staff or $5,000 a head members, which means views from the free software community and citizens rights groups don't get heard. Although it should be pointed out that Danny Weitzner, chair of the PPWG, was a patent policy advisor to the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Perens was most vocal when the W3C's intention to bless pay-to-play emerged, promising to "fork" the web by encouraging alternatives royalty-free web standards.

The news drew a cautious welcome from Linux kernel developer Daniel Philips, who helped lead the charge against RAND licenses on the W3C PPWG mailing list, and in these pages.

In all, the W3C received 2,000 comments, almost all fiercely critical, and Weitzner confirmed that after these have been digested, a second draft policy paper will be pubished.

Which way now?
Of the two thousand comments, one crept in from Apple at the very death of the extended consultation period, but it's a highly significant comment.

Apple manages to look both ways: after declaring that it prefers royalty-free licenses for web technology, it goes on to defend its right not to royalty-bearing technologies to the W3C. This is how it has always been, with the market leader du jour (in browsers, it was Netscape, now it's Microsoft) preferring to go its own way on bleeding edge technology.

With its tiny market share, Apple is a negligible influence on the most end-users but a significant player in vertical multimedia markets, which represent an area where the W3C wants to be playing if it's to remain relevant. So while an Apple can't disrupt consumers in the way that a Microsoft can, by implementing non standard http or html extensions for example, it does mean that much of the W3C's multimedia work can be stalled, or rendered (no pun intended) marginal.

Plus ca change, there then. But while Apple and Adobe can carry on with business as usual, IBM is left with some awkward decisions. It was Big Blue, remember, that asked for the traditional W3C royalty-free model to be supplemented with RAND licenses, with its own SOAP submissions the primary concern. This sits at odds with IBM's much vaunted pitch to compete on implementation and services rather than competing standards, and so persuading IBM to drop the royalty-option on its XML work will be the key political battle in the W3C in the coming weeks. ®

Related Stories

IBM risks billion dollar Linux strategy with W3C RAND demands
W3C denies misleading world+dog on RAND license status
We'll fork the Web to keep it Free - Perens
W3C defends RAND license
The free Web's over, as W3C blesses Net patent taxes

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
Android engineer: We DIDN'T copy Apple OR follow Samsung's orders
Veep testifies for Samsung during Apple patent trial
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Windows XP still has 27 per cent market share on its deathbed
Windows 7 making some gains on XP Death Day
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
Windows 8.1, which you probably haven't upgraded to yet, ALREADY OBSOLETE
Pre-Update versions of new Windows version will no longer support patches
Microsoft TIER SMEAR changes app prices whether devs ask or not
Some go up, some go down, Redmond goes silent
Red Hat to ship RHEL 7 release candidate with a taste of container tech
Grab 'near-final' version of next Enterprise Linux next week
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.