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AMD to bring performance ratings to other CPUs

'Deep in Squat' coming to mobile, server parts

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AMD yesterday pledged to apply its new buzzword, QuantiSpeed, to all of the processors it offers based on the Palomino core.

QuantiSpeed is the term the chip company hopes will allow consumers to understand why, say, a 1.53GHz Athlon XP processor runs faster than a 1.8GHz Thunderbird. That performance lead is implicit in the XP's 1800+ model designation.

The technology behind QuantiSpeed are essentially all that makes the Palomino core different from the Thunderbird. So clearly the same advantages apply to AMD's other Palomino-based processors, the mobile Athlon 4 and the Athlon MP server chip.

Yet AMD didn't feel the need to stress how those parts offer higher levels of performance than their clock speeds suggest. Odd that, but then Intel didn't have 2GHz Pentium 4s out back then to stress AMD's lower clock speeds.

That will change in the coming quarters, said the head of AMD's PC processor division, Dirk Meyer. AMD will bring the XP's new naming scheme to future processor launches.

Or not, if the move proves a flop with confused PC buyers. ®

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