Feeds

Dubai hacker loses appeal

Double jeopardy for 22-year old Brit

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

The appeal of a 22 year-old Briton against his hacking sentence has backfired. A court in Dubai has not only upheld his conviction, but also found him guilty of a charge that was dismissed at his original trial.

Lee Alan Ashurst, from Oldham near Manchester, was found guilty of opening the private emails destined for staff of ISP Etisalat as well as "misusing the services" of the Arab ISP in a judgement before the Dubai Appeal Court, according to a report by Arab news service Zawya.com.

The ruling confirmed the fine of 10,000 Dirhams (£1,850) against Ashurst on the hacking charge and added a conviction for opening the private emails of Etisalat staffers, which a lower court dismissed on legal grounds during a trial in July.

The case prompted the UAE to introduce legislation against hacking.

In a separate civil case, Etisalat (the United Arab Emirates sole ISP) is suing Ashurst for 2,835,000 Dirhams (£524,000) in damages, which it claims to have incurred due to Ashurst's hacking activity.

Etisalat claims that Ashurst scanned its network and discovered security gaps which he was able to exploit and recover password files. He was then able to gain unauthorised access to its network, according to Etisalat, which alleges Ashurst was the source of "extensive disruption to its service".

Zawya.com reports that a forensic examination of Ashurst's laptop found 'John the Ripper' and 'Saint', security tools which though not in themselves illegal, cast suspicion on Ashurst because they can be used by hackers. ®

External Links

Dubai court finds hacker guilty on two charges
BBC story of Ashurst's trail which features a picture of the 22 year-old

Related Stories

We've cracked into bin Laden's bank - UK hackers
Taiwanese engineer pleads self defence in hacking case
Welsh hacker pleads guilty to deception and theft
New anti-terror bill limits life sentence for hackers
NASA hacker 'rolex' jailed for four months

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Webcam hacker pervs in MASS HOME INVASION
You thought you were all alone? Nope – change your password, says ICO
You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes
Free anti-virus software, expires, stops updating and p0wns the world
Meet OneRNG: a fully-open entropy generator for a paranoid age
Kiwis to seek random investors for crowd-funded randomiser
USB coding anarchy: Consider all sticks licked
Thumb drive design ruled by almighty buck
Attack reveals 81 percent of Tor users but admins call for calm
Cisco Netflow a handy tool for cheapskate attackers
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The hidden costs of self-signed SSL certificates
Exploring the true TCO for self-signed SSL certificates, including a side-by-side comparison of a self-signed architecture versus working with a third-party SSL vendor.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.