Feeds

Intel takes bumps off packaging

BBULs hit solder balls

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The boffins at Intel have developed a new means of casing the guts of a processor. The technology, called “Bumpless Build-Up Layer” (BBUL), will only start to be used in the somewhat distant future to build processors, but will pave the way to deliver the “performance of billion-transistor processors”.

Currently, the case (or package) of the processor is bonded to its innards via tiny balls of solder called bumps, making the electrical and mechanical connection between the package and chip. This creates various technical problems as the clock frequency ramps exponentially up in the future, hence the introduction of this new technology: BBUL, which eliminates usage of these bumps completely.

Essentially, instead of taking a processor and soldering a case onto it, this technique “grows” the package around the chip. Intel’s press release doesn’t go into any more detail as to what exactly it means by this.

The company plans to start using this technology around 2006/2007. ®

Related Story

Intel's Desktop Roadmap

Intel Researchers Disclose Packaging Technology Breakthrough To Enable Billion-Transistor Processors

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.