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Did Captain Cyborg implant a dog tracking chip?

Photographic evidence

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We've often pondered exactly what the magic chip that Kevin Warwick believes transformed him into a cyborg is.

To reiterate, Kev claims the chip implanted in his arm (put under several millimetres of skin for nine days) enabled the doors of his office to open for him, turn his computer on and switch lights on and off.

We concluded that it was basically a location device and the real technology came with the door recognising that the device was close to it. Same with the computer, lights etc. We decided the term "reed switch" was more appropriate.

Now, however, thanks to vulture-eyed reader Paul Trezise we can finally reveal what it is. It is a pet-tagging chip "implanted" into dogs and cats so you don't lose them. You can buy one at Chippet.com. See here.

Kev's on the other hand is viewable on his university's pages here.

Both are pictured below. Which just goes to show that man's best friends have been cyborgs long before Kevin. ®

A comparison of the two chips

The pic's a joke you half-wit


Will you PLEASE not email me to tell me the pics above are the wrong way round. Let us assure you it was entirely intentional and is a sort of an homage to UK satirical paper Private Eye which always puts the wrong caption on look-a-likes. See here.

If you are wondering how you are supposed to know it was a joke, look at it like this. We at The Register are not completely stupid. Now, the reason the picture is funny is because the two chips are clearly so different.

While Kevin Warwick's claims that his chip turned him into a cyborg are rubbish, the chip itself is bound to be a little more complicated that something you put into a dog. And as for the reader that wrote "the implants are clearly not identical, although they are of the same form, rather like an aspirin tablet looks similar to a paracetamol tablet", well, we really don't know what to do. You are officially banned from looking at The Reg until Monday.

We shake our head sadly at the rest of you.

Related Links

The Chippet.com chip
Kev's chip

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