Feeds

User group calls for anti-virus early warning alerts

Vendors don't seem very happy

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

Virus Bulletin A grassroots organisation representing the interests of corporate users has received a frosty welcome from the anti-virus community.

Avien.org, which was represented by IT admins from Boeing, Ford and KPMG during a keynote presentation at Virus Bulletin yesterday, generated mutterings of discontent by stating that its early warning alerts picked up the spread of dangerous viruses three hours before vendors.

Together Avien represents firms with three million PCs, so it carries a lot of clout.

Avien provides a forum for end users to share experiences, product issues and, most importantly, early warnings (EWS) alerts on possible viruses.

On the face of it Avien's wish list for anti-virus products that work in the real world, an end to vendor-squabbling and specific product improvements on management and automatic detection (among others) seem eminently reasonable. In most sub-sectors of the IT industry their requests would be closely listened to, and likely heeded.

But this is the anti-virus market, where the vendors know best and customer requirements (according to members of Avien we talked to) can sometimes be secondary.

Questions from anti-virus vendors showed they were uncomfortable with welcoming Avien into the community, which an industry delegate we spoke to freely admitted was "closed" and "Masonic".

No AV vendors are allowed to become members (though a handful subscribe to the early warning alerts). This decision generated some plaintive questions, even though wider vendor membership would (at the least) stymie debate.

A representative from Symari, which specialises in scanning messaging systems for viruses, said that the custom for vendors is to issue alerts only when product fixes are in place.

Avien members argue that this is an outdated view because even limited information on email-borne worms would allow firms to carry out filtering operations, an approach applied with success by Avien members hours before updates to detect the Nimda worm were available. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Experian subsidiary faces MEGA-PROBE for 'selling consumer data to fraudster'
US attorneys general roll up sleeves, snap on gloves
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.