Feeds

User group calls for anti-virus early warning alerts

Vendors don't seem very happy

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Virus Bulletin A grassroots organisation representing the interests of corporate users has received a frosty welcome from the anti-virus community.

Avien.org, which was represented by IT admins from Boeing, Ford and KPMG during a keynote presentation at Virus Bulletin yesterday, generated mutterings of discontent by stating that its early warning alerts picked up the spread of dangerous viruses three hours before vendors.

Together Avien represents firms with three million PCs, so it carries a lot of clout.

Avien provides a forum for end users to share experiences, product issues and, most importantly, early warnings (EWS) alerts on possible viruses.

On the face of it Avien's wish list for anti-virus products that work in the real world, an end to vendor-squabbling and specific product improvements on management and automatic detection (among others) seem eminently reasonable. In most sub-sectors of the IT industry their requests would be closely listened to, and likely heeded.

But this is the anti-virus market, where the vendors know best and customer requirements (according to members of Avien we talked to) can sometimes be secondary.

Questions from anti-virus vendors showed they were uncomfortable with welcoming Avien into the community, which an industry delegate we spoke to freely admitted was "closed" and "Masonic".

No AV vendors are allowed to become members (though a handful subscribe to the early warning alerts). This decision generated some plaintive questions, even though wider vendor membership would (at the least) stymie debate.

A representative from Symari, which specialises in scanning messaging systems for viruses, said that the custom for vendors is to issue alerts only when product fixes are in place.

Avien members argue that this is an outdated view because even limited information on email-borne worms would allow firms to carry out filtering operations, an approach applied with success by Avien members hours before updates to detect the Nimda worm were available. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
Chinese hackers spied on investigators of Flight MH370 - report
Classified data on flight's disappearance pinched
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Researchers camouflage haxxor traps with fake application traffic
Honeypots sweetened to resemble actual workloads, complete with 'secure' logins
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.