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Top Web design firm Deepend goes under

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Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Multiple award-winning UK Web design firm Deepend has gone into liquidation with the loss of all its 90 staff.

At a meeting yesterday, staff were told that due to uncertainty over the US terrorist attacks and a slowdown in the market, two main investors in the company had backed out, leaving it no option but to go into liquidation.

All staff have been fired with immediate effect and may not be paid for the month of September. We called to check the details but a spokeswoman was unwilling to elaborate save to confirm the company's liquidation. No staff were in the building and the directors are in a meeting, we were told.

Deepend has been an enormous success in the Web design market, boasting a virtual A to Z of big UK firms among its clients. It has been frequently featured in articles ranging from the New York Times to online news sites and won a huge array of awards.

It was started in 1994 by three young designers and through its success had expanded into seven different companies in a very short period of time. ®

Related Link

Deepend.co.uk

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