Feeds

Face recognition software gets a boost

And other 'collateral damage' in the war on civil liberties

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

Face recognition software is attracting interest in the US Department of Transportation, which, according to reports in the Washington Post, is considering installing the Visionics 'FaceIt' system at National Airport when it reopens. This is going to make us all safer by scanning crowds for terrorist look-alikes. When the cops using it get bored, they can always add deadbeat dads and parking-meter scofflaws to the mix....



A ghastly draft bill called the Mobilization Against Terrorism Act (

MATA

) is set to be rammed through Congress this week. Among the windfalls for the US securocracy is a nice little exception allowing evidence gathered by foreign intelligence services against US citizens to be used against them in court. In other words, the CIA can just hire the Mossad to do its dirty work, skirting laws which forbid such agencies from spying on US citizens....



A report by

Time

magazine claims that the Bush Administration is considering the establishment of special military tribunals to deal with suspected terrorists, without the irritating protections afforded by the US Constitution. If this is true, we can look forward to an exemplary conviction rate....



There is also talk of stricter crypto export controls, key escrow, and an absurd notion advocating the insertion of back doors in crypto products, which is just what the financial sector needs. If it's easier for the Feds to get in, then it's easier for criminals to do the same. Hello?

US Senator Judd Gregg (Republican, New Hampshire) is leading the anti-crypto charge on the Hill, and says he'll likely have a draft measure available this week....



The government may be biding its time with its promised attack on Al Qaeda, but it's not wasting a split second going to war with the Bill of Rights, in a frenzy of bureaucratic and legislative measures aimed at exploiting the tragedy of 11 September for the benefit of the law-enforcement, national security and intelligence establishments.

Most people are, for now, willing to accept a good deal of this federal Nanny action, being still largely in a state of shock from the atrocities witnessed this month. But it's important to remember that individual rights conceded to the government for particular purposes have a funny way of never getting restored. ®

Assault on America: Full coverage

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Why Oracle CEO Larry Ellison had to go ... Except he hasn't
Silicon Valley's veteran seadog in piratical Putin impression
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.