Feeds

Teenage Mutant Nimda email rides the Code Red worm

AV tools light up like a Xmas tree

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Updated again A mass mailing email worm that contains exploit components from the infamous Code Red worm has appeared on the Internet, and appears to be spreading fast.

Nimda, which spreads though an infected email attachment, appears at the user's In-box with a random subject line and no body text. It comes with attachments called readme.exe and an HTML file. Users are advised to open neither and delete suspicious emails.

The malicious code contains an exploit string similar to that in the Code Red worm which is causing software tools that detect Code Red to "light up like Christmas trees", we hear.

MessageLabs, a managed services firm which scans its customers email for viruses, has intercepted 164 copies of the virus so far, after it first appeared this afternoon, possibly originating from Korea.

Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant at Sophos, said early analysis suggested the virus tries to add malicious JavaScript to Web pages on IIS servers that are vulnerable to the Code Red worm. But how the virus works remains unclear.

AV software vendors are busily updating their software to detect the worm. ®

Update

An increase in port 80 scanning relating to the Nimda worm - which attempts to hit IIS boxes with many different exploits - has been reported by CERT. Its scanning activities might result in some overall slowdown of the Internet.

Central Command has published a more detailed description of the worm which states that although the body of an email appears blank, it contains code that will execute if a user views a message in either Outlook or Outlook Express.

To spread, Nimda uses MAPI (Mailing API) functions in order to extract email addresses, according to Central Command.

Another method to spread is by using a Unicode Web Traversal exploit similar to Code Blue targets which, as previously reported, tries to reprogramme systems previously infected by the Code Red worm.

Related Stories

Code Blue targets Red China
Code Red busting code gets cool reception
Code Red and the Cisco Side Effect
Son of Code Red is born
Users haven't learned any lessons from the Love Bug
A plague on all our networks
Linux Trojan spotted in the wild
SirCam tops Virus charts

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
'Kim Kardashian snaps naked selfies with a BLACKBERRY'. *Twitterati gasps*
More alleged private, nude celeb pics appear online
Hackers pop Brazil newspaper to root home routers
Step One: try default passwords. Step Two: Repeat Step One until success
UK.gov lobs another fistful of change at SME infosec nightmares
Senior Lib Dem in 'trying to be relevant' shocker. It's only taxpayers' money, after all
Spies would need SUPER POWERS to tap undersea cables
Why mess with armoured 10kV cables when land-based, and legal, snoop tools are easier?
TOR users become FBI's No.1 hacking target after legal power grab
Be afeared, me hearties, these scoundrels be spying our signals
Snowden, Dotcom, throw bombs into NZ election campaign
Claim of tapped undersea cable refuted by Kiwi PM as Kim claims extradition plot
Freenode IRC users told to change passwords after securo-breach
Miscreants probably got in, you guys know the drill by now
THREE QUARTERS of Android mobes open to web page spy bug
Metasploit module gobbles KitKat SOP slop
BitTorrent's peer-to-peer chat app Bleep goes live as public alpha
A good day for privacy as invisble.im also reveals its approach to untraceable chats
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.