Feeds

Online merchant emails customer credit card details

Bone-headed security breach

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top three mobile application threats

Dabs.com has booted merchants BuyB4Sold.com off its Dabsxchange auction site after the latter committed a serious security breach involving its customers' credit card details.

On 7 September BuyB4Sold.com distributed an email to their customers, who had purchased products from a virtual auction hosted by Dabs, with an Excel attachment containing credit card details of other customers.

A Register reader informed us that the offending email contained names, addresses, telephone numbers, credit card numbers and credit card expiry dates of customers.

The 127 people affected by breach, which was the result of human error, have been advised to contact their credit card companies to get cards cancelled.

Dave Atherton, managing director of Dabs.com, described the actions of BuyB4Sold.com as "sloppy" and although the breach had nothing to do with the security of its auction site it decided it appropriate to sever links with the firm.

BuyB4Sold.com sells software and games in a similar manner to book clubs making its money from postage and packing charges on software that is sometimes listed as being "free". It is a marketing program run by retail Web site Onehighstreet.com.

In February, we reported that Onehighstreet.com left customer details in plain view on an insecure Web server, now its security has been called into question again.

Carl Laidler, concept development direct at Onehighstreet.com, said the security breach was a result of human error. A member of the firm's customer service team emailed a customer spreadsheet out without reference to any accepted procedures.

That person is the subject of disciplinary proceedings.

To restore confidence, Onehighstreet.com has withdrawn its online sales activities for between seven and 14 days during which time it is bringing in an external consultant to conduct a security audit. ®

Related Stories

Online security gaffe exposes consumers' bank details
Credit card scam puts dotcom close to death

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Sorry London, Europe's top tech city is Munich
New 'Atlas of ICT Activity' finds innovation isn't happening at Silicon Roundabout
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.