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Intel launches i845 Pentium 4 PC133 chipset

Up to 35% more expensive that DDR parts

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Intel formally launched its Pentium 4-oriented, PC133-based i845 chipset - aka Brookdale - today, as world+dog has been expecting since it began shipping several weeks ago (see Intel to launch i845 'Brookdale' on Monday).

The i845 comprises the 82845 north-bridge, which hooks the P4's 400MHz frontside bus up to the PC133 SDRAM - up to 3GB of it, more than the i850 - and wires in an AGP 4x slot. I/O connectivity is provided by the 82801 BA south-bridge, which supports up to four USB ports, two ultra ATA/100 channels, six-channel surround sound, and integrated networking.

Intel is also offering two mobos based on the i845: the ATX-sized D845WN and the micro-ATX D845HV. The chipset itself costs $42, so it is indeed rather more expensive that Acer's Aladdin P4's $31 - 36 per cent more, in fact - and VIA's controversial P4X266 ($34), both of them based on faster DDR memory. ®

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