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Notebook sales rise 9%

6.3 million snapped up in Q2

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Notebook sales grew nine per cent in the second quarter to around 6.3 million.

For the first time notebooks accounted for more than a fifth of all computer sales - and as prices drop, notebooks are expected to keep gaining market share, according to a report from Display Search.

It predicts laptops will make up 20 per cent of all computer sales in 2001, and 27 per cent in 2006 - compared to 18.3 per cent last year.

However, the market research company warned it had cut sales forecasts for 2001 to 25.8 million from 27 million.

Larger screens continued to gain popularity, with 14.1-inch and 15-inch displays grabbing a combined market share of 63 per cent of notebook sales, compared to 49 per cent in Q2 2000.

Samsung continued to be the dominant supplier of notebook displays despite its market share dropping one per cent sequentially to 23 per cent. LG Philips took 17 per cent, up from 15 per cent in Q1. Hitachi also lost market share - falling to 11 per cent from 13 per cent, with AU Optronics (formed by the merger of Acer Display and Unipac) rising one per cent at ten per cent.

Earlier this year IDC dropped its forecast for total computer sales, including PCs, in 2001. Shipments are now expected to grow 5.8 per cent to 138.9 million - growth was previously tipped to reach 10.3 per cent. ®

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Displaysearch statement

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