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BT rebranding dictated by Internet

Blimey, telco finally comes to senses

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BT has finally demonstrated some grasp of Internet pre-planning with today's rebranding of its mobile group to mmO2 just before it floats it. The name will be reduced to just O2 for consumers.

Unlike last time it rebranded - just a few months ago - it has realised that it's best to register related domain names before telling the world what you plan to call yourself.

But - get this - not only did BT register the appropriate domains that it could get hold of, but it also registered confusingly similar domains and registered them under an employee's name rather than draw attention to itself by using the corporate name.

Even more incredibly, the entire corporate name may have been changed just to allow for the registering of domain names. How else can you explain the extra "m" at the front of the name? M for mobile, yes. But what the hell is the other "m" for? It certainly doesn't mention it in the press release it sent out first thing this morning.

Could it be that since all the main domains of mO2 and m02 have been registered, legitimately, for ages, that BT decided simply to add an "m" and then pick them up?

Quite possibly, especially since out of the eight domains of mmO2.com, co.uk, net and org and mm02.com, co.uk, net and org, BT has managed to register six of them, with one still available. Only www.mm02.com lies outside its grasp.

Of course, it hasn't had as much luck with the plain ole O2 and 02 domains. Of those eight, BT has one. That being www.O2.com - not bad, since it is the most important.

The domain www.02.com is up for sale and we have asked Online Sales.com how much it wants for it - we'll tell you when they get back. Domain www.mm02.com is owned by New Strategies and greets you with a big gif shouting "Cash in your hands" - which may well be true if BT is thinks it's worth coughing up for. ®

And so, well done BT. Not only have you finally worked out how the Internet works but you have even managed to think before you speak. You even changed the name of your company to fit in with the Internet.

Can we now look forward to another rebranding of Future BT so you can get some domains for that? ®

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