Feeds

Amiga flogs Win, Linux Amiga DE player for $20

More desperate users - or cash?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Amiga is to charge $19.95 for its answer to the Java Virtual Machine, the Amiga DE Player, in a bid to win support for its Amiga DE multimedia application environment [surely 'in a bid to make any revenue, anyhow?' - Ed]

The Player will run under Windows and Linux and gives both platforms the ability to run content developed for Amiga DE.

Amiga DE is, of course, the new, software-only Amiga's attempt to create a platform-independent environment for home entertainment. It's based on Java technology from British developer Tao Systems and will be included in Sharp's upcoming Linux-based PDA.

Of course, the trouble with all this is that it's trying to do what Java failed to do, viz provide a universal platform for application delivery. Java has succeeded in becoming a major basis for object-oriented software development, but the idea that once every platform under the sun (no pun intended) had a JVM, no one would develop platform-specific code was never realised.

We'd time its death to around about the day when even Corel understood it wasn't going to happen and canned its WordPerfect Office for Java project.

If Sun couldn't make it happen with Java on the basis of allowing anyone to write JVMs and give them away for free, we can't help but think Amiga's plan to make people pay for this stuff has even less chance of success.

Doubly so when this allegedly advanced technology can only be used to knock up half a dozen puzzle games of the kind we haven't seen since we won an Atari Lynx in 1989.

Oh, and porting to just Windows and Linux isn't our idea of platform independence.

Amiga DE will ship for $19.95 next month, though early adopters can pre-order now for $14.95. The apps won't be free either. ®

Related Stories

Sharp launches next-gen Zaurus, promises 3G wireless version
Sharp Linux PDA to be first next-gen Amiga device
'Amiga is Back and will change computing forever, again'

Related Link

Amiga: AmigaDE Player and AmigaDE Shop

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?