Feeds

Dead people rise in support of Microsoft

Another lobbying campaign corpses...

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

Dead people are flocking to Microsoft's Freedom to Innovate banner, and bombarding States attorneys general with letters demanding they lay off the much misunderstood Beast, according to a story in today's Seattle Times. Well, not exactly, but theTimes details how Utah's attorney general got suspicious when two of the people who wrote him turned out to be dead, and many of the letters he was getting seemed to have various phrases in common.

The letters from beyond had apparently been sent to the deceased for signing, and the bereaved relatives had crossed out the name and signed instead. We're not sure which is worse for Microsoft - do you have to be dead to support the company, or do you die immediately after deciding to support them? Or maybe the Forces of Light just strike you down.

The letters themselves were part of a campaign run by Americans for Technology Leadership, an offshoot of the Association for Competitive Technology. ATL ran what purported to be a telephone poll on the Microsoft case, and then sent anyone expressing support for Microsoft letters for signing and stamped envelopes addressed to the relevant attorney general, member of Congress, and President Bush.

This campaign follows an earlier one where identical letters were sent out, but here the letters have been tailored to be 'individual,' so that it really does look a bit like there's a real grass-roots groundswell in favour of sparing Bill and Co the rope. But the letters have some phrases in common, some of the return addresses don't actually exist, and some of them are, well, a dead giveaway.

In campaigns of this sort, the letters are usually identical, so the recipients toss them and carry on as before. Now it seems they'll be looking for key examples of Microspeak in them (Iowa has identified "Strong competition and innovation have been the twin hallmarks of the technology industry" and "If the future is going to be as successful as the recent past, the technology sector must remain free from excess regulation"), then tossing them and carrying on as before. ®

Related link:
Seattle Times report

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

More from The Register

next story
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
DARPA-derived secure microkernel goes open source tomorrow
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
Apple: We'll unleash OS X Yosemite beta on the MASSES on 24 July
Starting today, regular fanbois will be guinea pigs, it tells Reg
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.