Feeds

US broadband row gets louder

And we think we've got problems...

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

A bitter war of words is raging in the US over the roll-out of broadband services across the country.

Those in favour of the Freedom and Broadband Deployment Act - introduced in July 1999 - believe it will give a much needed fillip to the sector by removing red-tape that ties the hands of the Regional Bell Operating Companies (RBOCs).

Opponents fear that the bill - known as Tauzin-Dingell after co-sponsors William 'Billy' Tauzin, a Republican from Louisiana, and John Dingell, a Democrat from Michigan - will make the telcos even more dominant and snuff out any chance of genuine competition.

The latest salvo comes from the American ISP Association, a vocal opponent of the bill, which claims that the four Bell giants already have a stranglehold on DSL deployment.

It jumped on recent figures from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) which showed that DSL growth during the final six months of 2000 was 108 per cent, with annual growth running at a whopping 453 per cent.

Said Sue Ashdown of AISPA: "The upshot of this FCC report could not be more clear: it's a straightforward factual presentation on surging broadband deployment that torpedoes the whole rationale for Tauzin-Dingell.

"Tauzin-Dingell is grounded in the idea that rolling back one of the most important consumer protections of the 1996 Telecom Act is necessary to help the four Bell giants roll out DSL lines. But a 453 per cent annual increase shows how shallow that reasoning is!

"The other crucial fact - not included in today's report - is that fewer than one in five consumer and business DSL lines is administered by competing
carriers. All the rest are under Bell company control.

"So DSL deployment is surging and the Bell giants have a stranglehold on it.

"Rather than pursuing the Tauzin-Dingell give-away to the Bells, Congress should instead focus on bringing healthier competition to the DSL industry," she said. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
Broadband Secretary of SHEEP sensationally quits Cabinet
Maria Miller finally resigns over expenses row
Skype pimps pro-level broadcast service
Playing Cat and Mouse with the media
Beat it, freetards! Dyn to shut down no-cost dynamic DNS next month
... but don't worry, charter members, you're still in 'for life'
Like Google, Comcast might roll its own mobile voice network
Says anything's possible if regulators approve merger with Time Warner
EE dismisses DATA-BURNING glitch with Orange Mail app
Bug quietly slurps PAYG credit - yet EE denies it exists
Turnbull leaves Australia's broadband blackspots in the dark
New Statement of Expectations to NBN Co offers get-out clauses for blackspot builds
Facebook claims 100 MEEELLION active users in India
Who needs China when you've got the next billion in your sights?
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.