Feeds

Powerful supercomp grid for US boffins

13.6 Teraflop system will feature McKinley processors

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Four US research centres are to be linked to create an interconnected series of Linux clusters capable of processing 13.6 trillion calculations a second.

The computer 'grid' system - known as the Distributed Terascale Facility (DTF) or TeraGrid supercomputer- will enable American boffins to share computing resources over the world's fastest research network.

The plan is that researchers will be able to draw on the resources of the computing grid in much the same way that consumers draw electricity from a power grid.

Funded by the National Science Foundation to the tune of $53 million, its backers hope the system will lead to breakthroughs in life sciences, climate modelling and other critical academic disciplines. Building and deploying the DTF will take place over three years.
IBM Global Services will deploy clusters of IBM Linux systems at the four DTF sites beginning in the third quarter of 2002. The servers will contain the next generation of Intel's Itaniium microprocessor, McKinley.

These will build upon two existing clusters of 1,300-plus Itanium and IA-32 processors already deployed at the National Center for Supercomputing (NCSA), one of the four hubs of the network.

IBM supercomputing software will handle cluster and file management tasks, but there is a commitment to use of open protocols with the project.

The system will have a storage capacity of more than 600 terabytes of data, or the equivalent of 146 million full-length novels.

The Linux clusters will be connected to each other via a 40Gbps a dedicated network, supplied by Qwest. This will link to Abeliene, the high-performance network that links more than 180 research institutions across the States.

The four hubs of the supercomputer will be the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, the San Diego Supercomputing Center, Argonne National Laboratory and the California Institute of Technology. ®

External links

The world's most powerful computational infrastructure (press release by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications)

Related stories

Life, the universe and supercomputers
NASA's new supercomp sits on a desktop
AMD cluster sneaks in Supercomputer top 500 list
Sun's Oz super computer goes horribly pear shaped
$10m super'puter to crunch genetic code

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
NASA launches new climate model at SC14
75 days of supercomputing later ...
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
BOFH: WHERE did this 'fax-enabled' printer UPGRADE come from?
Don't worry about that cable, it's part of the config
Want to STUFF Facebook with blatant ADVERTISING? Fine! But you must PAY
Pony up or push off, Zuck tells social marketeers
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.