Feeds

Powerful supercomp grid for US boffins

13.6 Teraflop system will feature McKinley processors

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

Four US research centres are to be linked to create an interconnected series of Linux clusters capable of processing 13.6 trillion calculations a second.

The computer 'grid' system - known as the Distributed Terascale Facility (DTF) or TeraGrid supercomputer- will enable American boffins to share computing resources over the world's fastest research network.

The plan is that researchers will be able to draw on the resources of the computing grid in much the same way that consumers draw electricity from a power grid.

Funded by the National Science Foundation to the tune of $53 million, its backers hope the system will lead to breakthroughs in life sciences, climate modelling and other critical academic disciplines. Building and deploying the DTF will take place over three years.
IBM Global Services will deploy clusters of IBM Linux systems at the four DTF sites beginning in the third quarter of 2002. The servers will contain the next generation of Intel's Itaniium microprocessor, McKinley.

These will build upon two existing clusters of 1,300-plus Itanium and IA-32 processors already deployed at the National Center for Supercomputing (NCSA), one of the four hubs of the network.

IBM supercomputing software will handle cluster and file management tasks, but there is a commitment to use of open protocols with the project.

The system will have a storage capacity of more than 600 terabytes of data, or the equivalent of 146 million full-length novels.

The Linux clusters will be connected to each other via a 40Gbps a dedicated network, supplied by Qwest. This will link to Abeliene, the high-performance network that links more than 180 research institutions across the States.

The four hubs of the supercomputer will be the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, the San Diego Supercomputing Center, Argonne National Laboratory and the California Institute of Technology. ®

External links

The world's most powerful computational infrastructure (press release by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications)

Related stories

Life, the universe and supercomputers
NASA's new supercomp sits on a desktop
AMD cluster sneaks in Supercomputer top 500 list
Sun's Oz super computer goes horribly pear shaped
$10m super'puter to crunch genetic code

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.