Feeds

IT companies urged to help human rights in China

2008 Olympics should bring around Net change

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top three mobile application threats

A human rights group has called on computer and Internet companies involved in the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing to use their influence to bring about reform in China.

Sidney Jones, Asia director of Human Rights Watch (HRW) said: "This is one area where human rights and corporate interests should coincide

"More people will use Internet services, e-mail, and related technologies if they don't have to worry about getting arrested."

"As the Olympic momentum builds, Chinese Web sites are going to proliferate.

"The corporate sponsors are going to have to choose between helping China open up by getting these controls removed, or abetting repression by giving the government the technology for Internet censorship," he said.

In its report Freedom of Expression and the Internet in China HRW points out that the Chinese authorities have introduced more than sixty sets of regulations to govern Internet content since the government began permitting commercial Internet accounts in 1995.

Describing the conditions suffered by Net users in China, the report singles out the Beijing-based Feiyu Internet Cafe in Beijing. There, employees of the cybercafe routinely peer over people's shoulders and check their screens to ensure users are not accessing illegal content.

A note on each monitor reads: "The Feiyu Web Bar Warns its Clients: Please do Not Download Web Pages with Illicit, Violent or Reactionary Content…"

The report also details the plight of 14 Net users who have either been arrested or detained by the Chinese authorities.

Chi Shouzhu, for example, is currently in Lingyuan Prison, Liaoning Province, after being detained by police in April for downloading "political" articles from overseas Web sites.

And last August, school teacher, Jiang Shihua, was sentenced to two years in prison after posting a number of articles criticising the Government on a bulletin board, the report said. ®

Related Story

China shuts down 2,000 cybercafes

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Sorry London, Europe's top tech city is Munich
New 'Atlas of ICT Activity' finds innovation isn't happening at Silicon Roundabout
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.