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Intel's Desktop Roadmap

So farewell then, Pentium III

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Last week, we published what we believe to be Intel's release schedule for mobile processors and now it's the turn of the desktops.

The map is rather simpler than the mobile space, largely thanks to a much narrower product range that's getting narrower as the Pentium III is finally squeezed out, leaving Intel with two desktop families: Pentium 4 and Celeron.

As we get more information about the precise release dates of individual processors, we'll repost the schedule suitably amended.

August 2001

  • 1.13, 1.26GHz Pentium III - 0.13 micron Tualatin, 256KB L2, 133MHz FSB

Q3 2001

  • 1.9GHz, 2GHz Pentium 4 - 0.18 micron, 256KB L2

November 2001

  • 2, 2.2GHz Pentium 4 - 0.13 micron Northwood

Q4 2001

  • 950MHz Celeron - 0.18 micron Coppermine, 100MHz FSB

Q1 2002

  • 1GHz Celeron - 0.18 micron Coppermine, 100MHz FSB

Q2 2002

  • 2.4GHz Pentium 4 - 0.13 micron Northwood

  • 1GHz+ Celeron - 0.13 micron Tualatin, 100MHz FSB

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