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Britain's independent game developers association, TIGA, has been busy, with the group (co-founded by the likes of Elixir's Demis Hassabis and Rebellion's Jason Kingsley) notching up two new high profile affiliate members this week.

European Xbox VP Sandy Duncan had already announced at TIGA's launch in March that Microsoft would be seeking to join TIGA. Now the company has put its money where its mouth was, with the would-be console vendor stumping up a wad of cash of unknown size for the privilege.

"Being a pro-development company we are extremely proud to be members of TIGA," Duncan enthused. "An environment where developers can fully realise their creative potential unburdened by creativity stifling financial pressure is something that will benefit Xbox and the industry at large. It is something we should all aspire to."

Not to be outdone, current market leader Sony has also joined the group as an affiliate member, with SCEE's Zeno Colaco commenting that "the contribution of UK-based developers in the global games market has always been influential and we look forward to a working partnership with TIGA to develop this excellence further". The only no-show from the console manufacturers so far then is Nintendo, which is perhaps not surprising given its past record on third-party relations.

Meanwhile, TIGA have also announced that it will be holding its first elections this autumn, with four of the original board members staying on and room being made for eight more full members and two affiliate members to join them in helping to guide the organisation. Nominations will be open from 7-28 September, with voting kicking off on 22 October and the results announced at a TIGA party in late November. If you're a British-based developer and fancy taking an active role in TIGA's development, keep your eyes peeled for more information later in the summer. ®

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