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UMC cans 266 ‘slackers’

Scapegoats for sales downturn?

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Chip manufacturer United Microelectronics Corp (UMC) has canned 266 workers, claiming they weren't working hard enough.

Chairman Robert Tsao explained the move in a letter published on Sunday by the Chinese-language Commercial Times. Associated Press reports he said the company was entering a "combat state" and it had to "dispel" workers who aren't working hard enough.

Tsao went on to say that historically UMC was known for rewarding good workers, but slackers hadn't been punished. But all that is going to change. "You all should adapt a more rigorous attitude toward work and must double your demands on quality and efficiency at work," he wrote, according to EETimes.

Earlier in the month UMC said it was preparing to suspend production at two 8in fabs while demand remains depressed.

But in a letter to the workforce, Tsao encouraged staff to remain confident in the company's ability to cope with the downturn. He said there'd be no job losses. ®

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