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Desktop Tualatin goes on sale in Japan

1.13A GHz and 1.2GHz arrive

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Desktop-oriented versions of Intel's 1.13GHz and 1.2GHz 0.13 micron Pentium III processors - better known by their codename, Tualatin - have begun to appear in Japanese retail outlets, a sure sign that the chips' formal introduction is imminent.

The boxed Tualatins can be distinguished by an 'A' after the clock speed, ie. Pentium III 1.13A, according to piccies over at Japanese Web site PC Watch. The 1.2GHz part lacks the 'A', but that's probably because there's no Coppermine (0.18 micron) PIII that it could be confused with.

Both chips contain 256KB of on-die L2 cache, support a 133MHz frontside bus and run at 1.475V, according to the label. One store's advert for the 1.13GHz part says it will not work with mobos built for 0.18 micron PIIIs.

The new chips are marked for use in single-processor systems only - if you want the dual-CPU part, you'll need to opt for the already launched server Tualatin.

The box also contains an "Intel-designed thermal solution" - a fan, to the rest of us. ®

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