Feeds

Text a cab in Dublin

Sounds crap, but this is actually a really good idea

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Updated From next month, you'll be able to summon a cab in Dublin by simply sending a text message. E-Taxis has 1,000 new cars ready to hit the streets and life will never be the same again, it told The Guardian.

The idea is that you send an SMS message to E-Taxis' number. Triangulation is then used to check out the location and the message is automatically routed to the nearest cabs. A driver then calls the mobile to check on the fare.

The only thing we remain unclear about is whether triangulation is used to work out the cab's location or the person's location. We suspect it's the cab's - which is a shame because it means you'll have to give a load of information about your position in the text message when it would be nicer just to send a single word.

<update> The company has just been in touch to say it works like this: you send an SMS with the word "taxi" and triangulation is then used to work out where you are. Now, this does sound good.</update>

However, while this sounds like a naff publicity seeking idea, we really rather like it. If handled properly it should certainly improve the cab company's efficiency and that means you won't have to wait in the rain so long. It also saves you having to explain where you are and what you want when you are tired and emotional and the cab operator, who has been working for 23 hours straight, is off his head on reds.

The new Mercedes taxis will also let you pay for the fare with credit or debit cards, which will save you going five minutes out the way and having the cabbie mutter threateningly under his breath.

E-Taxis - formed out of local cab company City cabs and wireless apps developer Bellstream - also has a load of other ideas, like a combined Web and SMS portal, sponsorship with Adidas etc but that's all nonsense so we'll ignore it.

Still sounds good to us. Now all they have to do is find some cabbies that aren't miserable gits and will work past 10pm so we don't have to get dodgy illegal cabs in the evening. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.