Feeds

Stratus preps high availability Linux port

Something for the partners

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Development work is getting underway to port Linux to fault-tolerant hardware architecture developed by high-end server manufacturer Stratus.

Boston-based recruitment consultant Hollister Associates is looking a technical project leader, to lead a team of four engineers "to design and develop a fault tolerant version of Linux on Stratus' Fault Tolerant IA-32 architecture".

"This project will include the porting of Linux to Stratus FT hardware, kernel support for CPU and memory synchronisation, the addition of hot plug PCI support, and a device memory protection scheme," Hollister states in an ad. "The position involves design, development of code, participation in strategic product definition and customer presentations."

Stratus is best known as a niche supplier of fault-tolerant systems based on PA RISC chips, and running either HP-UX or its own proprietary VOS operating system. The firm uses redundant hardware components and approved software to offer high reliability servers to telcos and financial services firms.

Last month the firm announced the availability of its first servers based on Intel chips and Microsoft's Windows 2000 operating system, the ftServer 5200.

Stratus is firmly committed to developing Windows-based servers but has licensed its technology to partners, including NEC, which intend to develop Linux-based high availability servers.

David Chalmers, technology director EMEA for Stratus Technologies, said Stratus is putting together a small technical team to help its licencees bring Linux-versions of its products to market but it has no plans to do the same itself.

"Stratus has no intention of bringing a Linux-version of our servers to market. We see Linux as being more interesting for the development of embedded technologies," said Chalmers.

He does not believe there's a large market exists for continuously available Linux server, but of course this could change in the future.

Stratus obviously sees the greatest potential for its servers in the Windows market, and doubtless the Linux community will argue that's where its technology is most needed... ®

Related Stories:
Stratus applies fault tolerant tech to Wintel boxes
Stratus re-enters telco biz
Stratus in road to Damascus scenario
Compaq, Intel buy into Stratus

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
The cloud that goes puff: Seagate Central home NAS woes
4TB of home storage is great, until you wake up to a dead device
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
Intel offers ingenious piece of 10TB 3D NAND chippery
The race for next generation flash capacity now on
Want to STUFF Facebook with blatant ADVERTISING? Fine! But you must PAY
Pony up or push off, Zuck tells social marketeers
Oi, Europe! Tell US feds to GTFO of our servers, say Microsoft and pals
By writing a really angry letter about how it's harming our cloud business, ta
SAVE ME, NASA system builder, from my DEAD WORKSTATION
Anal-retentive hardware nerd in paws-on workstation crisis
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
The Heartbleed Bug: how to protect your business with Symantec
What happens when the next Heartbleed (or worse) comes along, and what can you do to weather another chapter in an all-too-familiar string of debilitating attacks?
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.