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Intel ships 1.8GHz P4, 900MHz Celeron

Fills out P4 line

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Intel released 1.6GHz and 1.8GHz Pentium 4 processors yesterday as we'd been expecting for a while and the company broadly signalled last week.

The chip giant also shipped a 900MHz desktop Celeron and an 850MHz Mobile Celeron.

The two P4s are priced at $294 and $562, respectively, in 1000-unit batches. The 1.8GHz price point is the one we had down for the forthcoming 2GHz part, so expect the 1.8GHz part to fall rapidly when the faster chip ships. Essentially, Intel is charging a premium for the top-speed CPU - having hacked back P4 prices so much last April, it needs as much margin as it can make.

How keen punters will be on a part that will soon be superseded by a faster chip at the same price remains to be seen. We should say that as yet we can't confirm that the 2GHz chip will be priced at $562 and not higher.

The 900MHz Celeron comes in at $103, the 850MHz mobile version at $134. ®

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