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Intel plans second 300mm development fab

D1D in Hillsboro to pilot 0.10 micron production

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Intel plans to expand its Hillsboro, Oregon facility with a new development fab, according a planning permission application the chip giant filed with local authorities late last week.

The new operation, do be called D1D, is believed to be destined to host Intel's efforts to produced 0.10 micron process technology on 300mm wafers.

The recently opened its $250 million D1C development facility at Hillsboro is ramping up Intel's 0.13 micron process on 300mm wafers. Hillsboro is also the site of the company's Fab 20 mainstream production plant.

The planning application details a three-story building with 175,000sq ft of fabrication facilities, according to local newspaper The Oregonian. The paper reckons Intel will hear within four weeks whether Hillsboro's bigwigs will allow it to build the plant.

If construction goes ahead, the plant will open some time in 2003, depending, of course, on Intel's desire to maintain its investment programme, which in turn depends on the economic climate. The company is committed to spending $7.5 billion this year alone on plant. ®

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Intel opens $250m 300mm wafer R&D plant

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The Oregonian: Intel plans chip plant

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