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The dark truth behind Terry Matthews' knighthood outrage

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Mitel founder honour enrages Canada

Canadian prime minister Jean Chretien has been sticking his two bits' worth into the Queen's birthday honours list. He is opposing a knighthood granted to Mitel founder Terry Matthews. Matthews holds dual UK/Canadian nationality, but Chretien is trying to block the honour. Why? Well, Ross Trusler has a bit of background info:

The 'Canadian protocol' you refer to is an Act of Canadian Parliament, also passed by the British House of Lords and signed by King George V. It prevents holders of Canadian citizenship from also holding British hereditary titles. 82 years later, it all seems rather silly, but nonetheless a little odd to see it ignored by the very British institutions that signed the Act.

Ah, we see. But there is more to this story, as David Chappel can reveal:

Because the last time you Brits asked re: one Conrad Black, our PM said "Niet!"

You see, our PM hates Black. Black owns some newspapers over here which were critical of the PM in some silly scandal regarding some grants to a hotel in the PM's home riding. Black sued and lost and in a huff said he'd renounce CDN citizenship. It was clearly a personal dispute, but the judge said our PM can say anything he wants. Now, every time you folks bestow titles upon Canuks or half Canuks, without asking our "other royal", our PM is pissed because he looks ineffectual, and petty, etc.

I must go now, there are some wee seal pups attempting to escape on yonder ice flow!!!

Good one - save some for us, won't you? Now, let's finish with what the the Canadians really think of their PM. Reg reader 'Brett' sums up:

In response to your (no doubt rhetorical) question, the answer is so simple that you won't believe you didn't figure it out for yourself. He is by far, the most arrogant, pompous, self righteous and egotistical son of a bitch ever to grace the halls of our beloved capital. As a Canadian, I'm completely embarrassed to have him as the representative of our once great country. And if you think that's bad, you should see the other schmucks that we as Canadians have the opportunity to vote for.

No, we'd rather not, if it's all the same to you.

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