Feeds

Oki C9200

Colour network printer

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

Review When we reviewed Oki's C7200N colour network printer in April it excelled in our tests, striking the ideal balance between print quality, speed and low running costs. But while the C7200N is aimed at small workgroups, the C9200 is Oki's high-end network printer, with a high price to match.

Oki C9200With 128MB of RAM as standard and A3 printing, the Oki is well equipped to cope with the most demanding office environments. Like other Oki network printers, it also uses an efficient printing method called single-pass technology, which generates greater print speeds than standard carousel-based printers.

At 600x600dpi (dots per inch), the Oki managed to output 21ppm (pages per minute) in monochrome and 17ppm in colour – impressive figures that barely drop when you bump up the resolution. Print quality was crisp and bright, but colour presentations were slightly faded in comparison with some of its rivals. The maximum resolution of 600x1200dpi also looks distinctly ordinary when you consider that the Xerox Phaser 750P offers true 1200dpi for half the price. But what you're paying for here is speed and efficiency. The hefty price tag is also offset by cheap running costs: one colour page costs 1.13p and a mono page costs 0.49p.

However, despite being aimed at a corporate network this model doesn't come with a network card as standard. To get one of these you have to opt for the C9200N or the DN, which also comes with a duplex unit.

At £4399, the C9200 is squarely aimed at the high-end business user. Print quality is impressive, if not outstanding, and some of the specifications are unremarkable. But this is a very fast printer able to cope with heavy workloads. ®

Info

Price: £4399
Contact: 01753 819 819
Website: www.oki.co.uk

Specs

Quoted Print Speed: 12 ppm colour
Maximum resolution: 600x1200dpi
Dimensions: 666x590x463mm
Weight: 72.0kg
Toner life: 15,000; max A3
RAM: 128MB
Input/output tray: 500-sheet

This review is taken from the July 2001 issue. All details correct at time of publication.

Copyright © 2001, IDG. All rights reserved.

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy
Press conference: ME ME ME ME ME ME ME (cont'd pg 94)
Premier League wants to PURGE ALL FOOTIE GIFs from social media
Not paying Murdoch? You're gonna get a right LEGALLING - thanks to automated software
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Ballmer quits Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Online tat bazaar eBay coughs to YET ANOTHER outage
Web-based flea market struck dumb by size and scale of fail
Amazon takes swipe at PayPal, Square with card reader for mobes
Etailer plans to undercut rivals with low transaction fee offer
Call of Duty daddy considers launching own movie studio
Activision Blizzard might like quality control of a CoD film
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.