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Nvidia to rethink Crush chipset's official moniker?

nForce already trademarked

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If Nvidia does indeed name its upcoming Athlon-oriented chipset nForce, as documents seen by The Register suggest, it may rapidly run into trademark trouble. nForce is said to be the official name of the chipset codenamed Crush.

UK-based data security specialist nCipher already uses nForce as a product name, and has trademarked the moniker.

nCipher describes its nForce as a "secure e-commerce accelerator". Essentially, you hook nForce up to your SSL server and offload all those complex crypto computations onto the box, just as you offload all your complex graphics calculations onto your Nvidia GeForce. Just as the graphics accelerator stops your CPU from clogging up, nForce prevents your e-commerce server from grinding to a halt.

Now, as it happens, we've heard whispers that Nvidia may already have changed Crush's official name, though whether it's been changed to nForce or from it, we haven't yet been able to confirm.

We should find out on Monday, when Nvidia is expected to launch Crush. ®

Related Story

Nvidia Crush chipset named nForce?

Related Link

nCipher's nForce page

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