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Nvidia Crush is called nForce

Mobo maker MSI confirms moniker

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Exclusive Motherboard maker MSI has confirmed that Nvidia's Crush chipset will be officially marketed as nForce.

Documentation recently seen by The Register suggests that nForce was the name chosen for the long-awaited Xbox-derived PC chipset codenamed Crush.

And now we have MSI's press release, launching its MS-6367 mobo, confirming that information. Says the release: "This is the first MSI mainboard which supports the Nvidia nForce Platform Processing Architecture (IGP: Integrated Graphics Processor; MCP: Media and Communications Processor)."

And: "The Nvidia nForce is a high-performance PC platform chipset with an which integrated Nvidia GeForce 2 GPU."

"AMD's Hyper Transport delivers the highest continuous throughput between the IGP and MCP (800MBps)," the release continues.

The board supports Socket A AMD Athlon and Duron processors. Up to 1.5GB of memory is support through three DDR SDRAM slots, but, says the release, "when using two DDR, with 128-bit TwinBank Architecture, the bandwidth accommodates 4.2GBps, which is twice faster than regular DDR platforms".

Here's MSI's pic of the board. It's small, but you can just make out the Nvidia 'eye' logo on a couple of the chips:

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MSI press release: MSI announced the new MS-6367 - Based on Nvidia nForce Architecture

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