Feeds

What the LibDems pledge on IT and the Net

Freedom, Justice, Honesty, No Chance

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

We've finally got onto the LibDems Web site and read its manifesto (13 chapters - unlucky for some) titled Freedom, Justice, Honesty.

The title is just slightly more accurate than the Tories "Common Sense" manifesto.

However, these are all the points in which the LibDems have mentioned IT and/or the Internet.

  • Improve Information and Communications Technology (ICT) support for teachers Basically, a computer leasing system through educational charities
  • Increase funding for computer equipment in schools £1250 a primary school and £4250 a secondary school per year. Schools decide where the money goes.
  • Libraries to offer free Internet access This idea is already afoot but it doesn't hurt to reiterate a good idea
  • Invest in a knowledge-based economy through research Mostly scientific research, but IT will surely feature. The extra funding will be provided by cutting finance for arms exports
  • Investigate Internet voting A promise to "investigate" how Internet voting could work alongside security concerns
  • Strengthen Freedom of Information legislation Not exactly about IT but with heavy IT and Internet implications, especially considering recent legislation and the Data Protection Act.

And that's it really. Nothing that stands out or surprises. You'd think with the Internet taking off, that at least one political party would use it to embarrass the others and the LibDems are in the best position to do so. It's a sure indication of the effect that failed ISPs, sloppy broadband roll-out, threatening Internet issues and easily visible mistakes have had on politicians.

One thing that did catch our eye though and is a true vote winner was this: "Protect village pubs and local breweries by extending the 50% mandatory rate relief currently enjoyed by some village shops and post offices to sole village pubs and encourage wider use of local authority powers to grant additional discretionary relief for services and businesses." Quite right.

Oh, and there was some stuff about increasing income tax by 1p in order to fund smaller class sizes and improve health, police and welfare services. ®

Related Stories

LibDems cybersquat on Plaid Cymru
LibDems Web site dies a death

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?