Register trademarks ‘ster’

Napster, AOLster, we're comin'at ya

When you see the word "aimster", do you think that it's a daft word for someone aiming at something or do you think "America Online Instant Messenger-ster"?

What about the "ster"? We think that we have as much a right to the name because The Register ends in "ster" and we're a well-known brand. From now on, anyone caught using a word ending with "ster" will have our lawyers set onto them immediately.

Yes, we're Ster Crazy. But nowhere near as barmy as the
The National Arbitration Forum, which forced Aimster to hand over its domain to AOL, because it apparently infringes AOL's trademark.

The idea is that since Aimster begins with A-I-M, it is infringing AOL's Instant Messenger name. But how on earth can this be true? When you see "aim", do you think of the verb "to aim" meaning 1. to plan to do something; 2. to target words, a message, an action of a product at a person or group; 3. to point a weapon or object at somebody or something, or do you think "Oh, America Online Instant Messenger"?

Does this mean that AOL has a right to every domain beginning with "aim"? Will guns clubs and politicians have to pay AOL a royalty every time they mention the verb/noun?

We are going to trademark "be". Any domain name then starting with B-E will be ours for the taking. Or maybe "go". That would be a good one. ®

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AOL wins rights to Aimster domain name

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