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HP recyles PCs – for a price

Will take any vendor's kit

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Hewlett Packard today kicks off a fee-based recycling scheme in the US that offers to take unwanted computers from any manufacturer.

The service, available via HP's Website, is part of the US vendor's Planet Partners Program.

The recycling scheme includes pickup and transportation for products such as PCs, printers, servers, monitors and scanners. Prices will range from $13 to $34, CNET reports.

According to HP, equipment will first be evaluated to see if it is fit to be donated to charities. The remaining equipment will be recycled in an environmentally-friendly way.

The launch comes as the European Commission mulls over a directive to make manufacturers pay to recycling unwanted electrical and electronic goods. The Waste of Electrical and Electronic equipment (WEEE) directive is expected to become law within the next 18 months, and will effect all companies that trade within Europe.

The European stage of HP's recycling service is expected to start on June 1.

According to figures from the National Safety Council, the amount of PCs deemed obsolete in 2002 will exceed the number of new PCs shipped. ®

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