Feeds

Intel talks 4G/next-gen mobile phone chips

Look at the bandwidth on that

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Intel has indicated that its wireless Internet on a chip could be available in as little as a year.

As previously reported, Intel yesterday announced the development of an experimental chip that features a microprocessor, flash memory and analogue communications circuits on a single slab of silicon.

According to Chipzilla, the technology, which will be developed in a family of chips, could be five times as powerful as those used in today's mobile phones, operate at speeds of up to 1GHz and provide "up to a month of battery life" (which sounds more than a tad optimistic).

Leif Persson, director of Intel's wireless competency centre, described that the chips are based on its XScale processor - the first iteration of StrongARM technology Intel acquired from Intel. He added the chips would be available "within a year or so" and will feature super pipelining, for faster execution, and multimedia capabilities.

The chips are targeted at next generation mobile phones and handhelds. Persson said these devices could be based on Linux, Microsoft's Pocket PC or Symbian's Epoc operating system.

Asked whether given this agnosticism to operating systems, Intel demos at its developer conference this week had almost exclusively featured Compaq iPaqs he said, "Epoc devices are not easy to get hold of".

We're not sure whether this is a disguised blagging request but since Symbian was a co-sponsor of the conference we're sure Leif won't find it too hard to get some kit if he really needed it.

Maybe he's got better things on his mind. Though years away, Intel is already putting thought into what may feature in 4G telecommunications devices. Persson, who readily agreed the industry was still very much grappling with 3G (which after all hasn't arrived yet), did have a couple of interesting ideas about the features of 4G devices (though he hates the term).

These include the ability to automatically move from a wireless Lan to a public network in order to access the Internet, and embedded Bluetooth support. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
IT crisis looming: 'What if AWS goes pop, runs out of cash?'
Public IaaS... something's gotta give - and it may be AWS
Linux? Bah! Red Hat has its eye on the CLOUD – and it wants to own it
CEO says it will be 'undisputed leader' in enterprise cloud tech
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
Troll hunter Rackspace turns Rotatable's bizarro patent to stone
News of the Weird: Screen-rotating technology declared unpatentable
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.